Correlation between Ultrafiltration Coefficient and Effective Lymphatic Absorption Rate in Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Possible Paradigm Shift

Reza Hekmat

Abstract


Background: The relative contribution of transcapillary water movement and lymphatic reabsorption in peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a critical issue, particularly in patients with ultrafiltration failure (UFF). Based on routine results obtained from the PD Adequest 2.0 software, the present study aimed to re-evaluate the separate effects of transcapillary water movement and lymphatic reabsorption on the net ultrafiltration capacity in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients without UFF.
Methods: Seventy CAPD patients without UFF and PD duration less than 2 years entered the study. The study was conducted during January-April 2016 at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. Each patient had 1 to 3 peritoneal equilibration test (PET) results which were used to analyze the determinants of fluid transport, lymphatic reabsorption, and ultrafiltration. Pearson and Spearman correlation tests were used to determine the correlation between continuous and ordinal factors, respectively. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software version 19.0.
Results: In terms of the effective lymphatic absorption rate (ELAR) and ultrafiltration coefficient (LpA) values, there was no difference in the high or high-average transporters compared to the low or low-average transporters. However, a positive and highly significant correlation between ELAR and LpA was found.
Conclusion: A significant correlation between ELAR and LpA was found in CAPD patients without UFF and duration less than 2 years from the beginning of PD.
The abstract was presented in the 53rd ERA-EDTA Congress, Austria, as a poster and published in Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation as a supplement (2016; Vol. 31).


Keywords


Peritoneal dialysis; Peritonitis; Ultrafiltration

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pISSN: 0253-0716         eISSN: 1735-3688