Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences

Document Type: Original Article(s)

Authors

1 Department of Dental Public Health, School of Dentistry, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

2 Health Policy Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran

3 Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

Abstract

Background: Detecting the latent dimensions of quality of life as affected by oral diseases is essential for promoting oral health in children. This study aimed to test the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) via an appropriate method to detect its dimensions of quality of life as affected by oral diseases.
Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was carried out in Shiraz, Iran, between 2014 and 2015. A multistage stratified design was used to select 830 parents or the guardians of primary school children aged 6 years. The Farsi version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (F-ECOHIS) was used to evaluate the children’s oral health-related quality of life. The parents were interviewed to collect data on ECOHIS. Mplus, version 7, was employed for descriptive and analytical analyses in the present study. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed to extract and verify the latent dimensions of ECOHIS.
Results: Out of the 830 invited parents or guardians, 801 participated in this study. The mean ECOHIS score was 21.95±7.45. The mean child impact score and the mean family impact score were 14.25±5.72 and 7.70±3.62, respectively. EFA yielded a 3-factor model: symptom and function, social interaction, and family impact. CFA confirmed the 3-dimensional model (root mean square error of approximation=0.045). The fit indices of the 1- and 2-dimensional models (the child and family domains) were not within the acceptable range.
Conclusion: F-ECOHIS is a 3-dimensional model rather than the hypothetical 6-dimensional model. ECOHIS appears to be a useful scale for measuring the multidimensional impact of oral diseases in children.

Keywords